The Anchor

Filed under Entertainment

Black Panther: The Album Review

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Black Panther, the movie, was released on February 16 in 2018 and made one billion dollars within its first month. Now, it fits in the top ten highest grossing films of all time and is extremely popular with a broad audience.

The movie had its album called Black Panther: The Album  release on February 9 one week before the movie was set to release. The album was co-created by Kendrick Lamar, The Weeknd, and SZA and features big names like: 2 Chainz, Khalid, ScHoolboy Q, Ab-Soul, and Travis Scott. Up front, I’ll say that after listening to this album multiple times and having ample time for hype to dive down, this album does not disappoint. It’s filled with great tracks across the board; some of which are upbeat and snappy or mellow and relaxed. It’s a perfect medium.

Three out of the fourteen tracks in the album appear in the film itself, those being “All The Stars,” “Opps,” and “Pray For Me,” the rest are simply inspired by the story in Black Panther. “All The Stars,” “X,” and “The Ways” are the second, third, and fourth tracks in the album, respectively, and create a back-to-back-to-back experience of incredible work on so many artists’ behalves.

“All The Stars” is the second track in the album and is sung by Kendrick Lamar and SZA. Kendrick raps, “Love, let’s talk about love–Is it anything and everything you hoped for?–Or do the feeling haunt you?–I know the feeling haunt you.” He suggests a question about the concept of love and what it can make an individual feel like, mainly being a sense of security but also insecurity. Love has the power to create bliss and joy, but it also has the ability to make one feel regret and to forever feel “haunted.”

In “X,” Kendrick Lamar, Saudi, ScHoolboy Q, and 2 Chainz all rap to create a track with some of the best flow in the entire album. Kendrick repetitiously raps “Are you on ten yet,” which is slang for “are you ready for action,” in relation to the film’s protagonist getting ready for his adventure. This means that the pronunciation of the title “X” could be “Ten” in regards to the Roman numeral for ten, but could also represent the action shown in the film of a quick crossing of the arms around the chest in the shape on an X to show respect for loyalty or friendship. Additionally, South African rapper Saudi shows his magic in the first verse of the song. He raps between English and Zulu, the language of his home, which creates one of the most unique feelings I’ve ever experienced while listening to music.

“The Ways” makes its way into my list of greatest songs for its significance as a piece of musical art. Khalid and Swae Lee collaborate to create a story of a man who views a certain woman as having an immense power about her that she doesn’t fully realize or identify with. He yearns to be with this woman due to her ability to be so pure and wholesome stating, “If I had you I’d travel light years for you” and repetitiously singing “I really wanna know your ways.” This ties back to the film’s main protagonist’s undying love and appreciation of his ex-girlfriend. The two remain as friends and fight alongside each other for the entire movie and by the end re-establish their relationship. The beat flows and the lyrics are simple and straightforward enough to tell this story.

“Seasons” reintroduces the Zulu language into rap with Sjava, Mozzy, and Reason. Sjava, another South African rapper, takes on the first verse of the song rapping only in Zulu and coming in on the chorus singing “Poverty, jealousy, negativity / Ngith’ ak’nandawo la / Go away…”

“Ngith’ ak’nandawo la” translates into “You have no place here” and connects the first and third bars of the chorus together. The theme behind the song is the near independence that some African countries will soon have from Western society, and the meaning in these lines is that aspects of dependency and despair that once characterized African civilizations now have been eliminated and are no longer accurate characteristics of these civilizations.

Overall, I have been extremely impressed with this album. It has good features, good beats, great lyricism, and is an extremely unique hip-hop album. My recommendations are as follows: “All The Stars,” “X,” “The Ways,” “Opps,” “Paramedic,” “King’s Dead,” “Redemption,” “Seasons,” and “Pray For Me” in chronological order. Nine out of fourteen total tracks being confident recommendations is pretty remarkable to me and I highly suggest you check them out. My personal favorites are “Seasons,” “The Ways,” “King’s Dead,” and “X” all in that order. “Seasons” and “X” both feature Zulu in the lyrics and the uniqueness created by the language is absolutely outstanding to me. But, as always, if you’re a hip-hop or rap fan, I’d recommend checking out the entire album at least once to get the full experience. Black Panther: The Album is a winner in my book.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Entertainment

    Olivia’s Top Movie Picks

  • Entertainment

    Top 5 Movie Releases of Summer 2018

  • Black Panther: The Album Review

    Entertainment

    Olivia’s Favorite TV Shows

  • Entertainment

    My Top 12 Songs

  • Entertainment

    Walmart Yodeler Makes it Big

  • Entertainment

    Planning a Successful Graduation Party

  • Black Panther: The Album Review

    Entertainment

    ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ (2018) Review

  • Black Panther: The Album Review

    Entertainment

    Seniors Reflect on High School

  • Black Panther: The Album Review

    Entertainment

    Xantastic or a Flaming Trash Xan?

  • Black Panther: The Album Review

    Entertainment

    ‘Rampage’ (2018) Review

The student news site of Farragut High School
Black Panther: The Album Review